Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Der Orchideengarten (1919-1921)

Der Orchideengarten - 1919 (Cover 3) Der Orchideengarten - 1919 (Cover 1) Der Orchideengarten - 1919 (Cover 6) Der Orchideengarten - 1920 (Cover 10) Der Orchideengarten - 1920 (Cover 14) Der Orchideengarten - 1920 (Cover 7) Der Orchideengarten - 1920 (Cover 19) Der Orchideengarten - 1921 (Cover 3) Der Orchideengarten - 1919 (Cover 2) Der Orchideengarten - 1920 (Cover 9) Der Orchideengarten - 1919 (Cover 7) Der Orchideengarten - 1920 (Cover 23) Der Orchideengarten - 1921 (Cover 10) Der Orchideengarten - 1920 (Cover 1) Der Orchideengarten - 1921 (Cover 4) Der Orchideengarten - 1920 (Cover 3) Der Orchideengarten - 1920 (Cover 8) Der Orchideengarten - 1920 (Cover 12) Der Orchideengarten - 1920 (Cover 11) Der Orchideengarten - 1919 (Cover 16) Der Orchideengarten - 1919 (Cover 9) Der Orchideengarten - 1920 (Cover 5) Der Orchideengarten - 1919 (Cover 14) Der Orchideengarten - 1920 (Cover 18) Der Orchideengarten - 1921 (Cover 8) Der Orchideengarten - 1920 (Cover 20) Der Orchideengarten - 1920 (Cover 17) Der Orchideengarten - 1919 (Cover 8) Der Orchideengarten - 1920 (Cover 13) Der Orchideengarten - 1920 (Cover 2) Der Orchideengarten - 1920 (Cover 4) Der Orchideengarten - 1919, Back Cover, Ernst Heigenmooser Der Orchideengarten - 1919, Otto Lietz - Orchideen Der Orchideengarten - January 1919 - Edwin Henel - Die Angst Der Orchideengarten - 1919, H.H. Bummerstedt - Der Gefangene Der Orchideengarten - 1920, W. Wellenstein - Ruin Der Orchideengarten - 1919, Anna May - Erscheinung Der Orchideengarten - 1919, Alfred Kubin - Der Hauskobold Der Orchideengarten - 1920, Otto Linnekogel - The Werewolf Der Orchideengarten - 1920, Verfolgung Der Orchideengarten - 1919, Rolf v. Hoerschelmann - Abendfriede Der Orchideengarten - 1919, Koro Otei - Der Leichensammler Der Orchideengarten - January 1919 - Alfred Ehlers - Heidegespenster Der Orchideengarten - 1920, Die Wilde Jagd - Nach einem alten Bilderbogen Der Orchideengarten - 1920, Gustave Dore Der Orchideengarten - 1919, Rudolf Hesse Der Orchideengarten - 1919, Wilhelm Kaulbach - Weide und Dornbusch

"Der Orchideengarten ('The Orchids-garden'; subtitled Phantastische Blätter or 'Fantastic Pages') was a German magazine that was published for 51 issues from January 1919 until November 1921.

Founded four years before the American magazine Weird Tales was initiated in March 1923, Der Orchideengarten is considered to be the first fantasy magazine. Also described as largely 'supernatural horror', it was edited by World War I correspondent and freelance writer Karl Hans Strobl and Alfons von Czibulka, published by Dreiländerverlag. It had 24 pages per issue printed on rough book paper.

The magazine included a wide selection of new and reprinted stories by both German-language and foreign writers. The main source of the translated material Der Orchideengarteen published was French literature; Der Orchideengarten published works by such authors as Voltaire, Charles Nodier, Guy de Maupassant, Théophile Gautier, Victor Hugo, Villiers de l'Isle-Adam and Guillaume Apollinaire. Other noted writers such as Apuleius, Charles Dickens, Pushkin, Edgar Allan Poe, Washington Irving, Amelia Edwards, Nathaniel Hawthorne, H. G. Wells, Valery Bryusov and Karel and Josef Čapek were all published in Der Ochideengarten. German language writers for the magazine included Strobl, Hermann Harry Schmitz, Leo Perutz and Alexander Moritz Frey, as well as reprinted stories by E. T. A. Hoffmann.

Illustrations included reproductions of medieval woodcuts and pictures by Gustave Dore and Tony Johannot, as well as contemporary artists such as Rolf von Hoerschelmann (1885–1947), Otto Linnekogel (1892–1981), Karl Ritter (1888-?), Heinrich Kley, Alfred Kubin, Eric Godal (1899–1969), Carl Rabus, (1898–1982) (famous for his work in the magazine Jugend) Otto Nückel and Max Schenke (1891–1957)."  - quote source


Artworks found in the complete scan collection of Der Orchideengarten at the Heidelberg digital archive.  Link found thanks to the incredible artist, Fufu Frauenwahl.

Additional posts on Der Orchideengarten can be found at 50 watts.

Saturday, August 27, 2016

John Yunge-Bateman

John Yunge Bateman - Illustration from King Lear - Act IV, Scene 1, 1930Illustration from 1930 edition of King Lear - Act IV, Scene 1.
Crazy Edgar, now calling himself Poor Tom: “Five fiends have been in poor Tom at once: of lust, as Obidicut; Hobbididence, prince of dumbness; Mahu, of stealing; Modo, of murder; Flibbertigibbet, of mopping and mowing, who since possesses chambermaids and waiting-women.”

John Yunge Bateman - Illustration from King Lear - Act I, Scene 1, 1930Illustration from 1930 edition of King Lear - Act I, Scene 1.
Kent to Lear: “To plainness honor’s bound / When majesty falls to folly.”

John Yunge Bateman - Illustration from King Lear - Act I, Scene 2, 1930Illustration from 1930 edition of King Lear - Act I, Scene 2.
Edmund says married people “doth within a dull, stale, tirèd bed / Go to th’ creating a whole tribe of fops”

John Yunge Bateman - Illustration from King Lear - Act I, Scene 3, 1930Illustration from 1930 edition of King Lear - Act I, Scene 3.
Goneril to Oswald: “If you come slack of former services / You shall do well.”

John Yunge Bateman - Illustration from King Lear - Act I, Scene 4, 1930Illustration from 1930 edition of King Lear - Act I, Scene 4. Lear.
“O Lear, Lear, Lear! / (strikes his head) Beat at this gate that let thy folly in / And thy dear judgment out!”

John Yunge Bateman - Illustration from King Lear - Act II, Scene 4, 1930Illustration from 1930 edition of King Lear - Act II, Scene 4.
Lear to Regan and Goneril: “If only to go warm were gorgeous, / Why, nature needs not what thou gorgeous wear’st, / Which scarcely keeps thee warm.”

John Yunge Bateman - Illustration from King Lear - Act III, Scene 4, 1930Illustration from 1930 edition of King Lear - Act III, Scene 4.
Lear’s Fool tells him to keep his clothes on: “Prithee, nuncle, be contented. ‘Tis a naughty night to swim in.”

John Yunge Bateman - Illustration from King Lear - Act IV, Scene 2, 1930Illustration from 1930 edition of King Lear - Act IV, Scene 2.
Goneril to Edmund: “This kiss, if it durst speak, / Would stretch thy spirits up into the air.”

John Yunge Bateman - Illustration from King Lear - Act IV, Scene 7, 1930Illustration from 1930 edition of King Lear - Act IV, Scene 7.
Lear to Cordelia: “Thou art a soul in bliss but I am bound / Upon a wheel of fire”

John Yunge Bateman - Illustration from King Lear - Act V, Scene 3, 1930Illustration from 1930 edition of King Lear - Act V, Scene 3.
Lear, carrying the dead body of his daughter Cordelia: “Howl, howl, howl, howl!”

John Yunge Bateman - SeductionSeduction

John Yunge Bateman - Three young women in cavern surrounded by small grotesque creatures, 1960 Title unknown, dated 1960

King Lear scans found at Book Graphics.  Additional artworks found at Biksady.com and Live Auctioneers.